George Mason University
George Mason University Mason
George Mason University

Featured Faculty

From teaching current courses to engaging in research of consequence, our faculty study, explore and solve technical and engineering problems. Their academic expertise and real-world knowledge bridge the space between academic theory and professional engineering.


 

Kathleen Wage, Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Kathleen Wage

Listening to the Ocean

Kathleen Wage, studies sounds in the ocean and loves to spend time on research ships.

Associate Professor Wage, in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has been at Mason since 1999. 

Some of the latest work of her research group involves analysis of data from experiments in the Philippine Sea. In 2009-2011 Wage spent 55 days onboard research ships, deploying arrays of hydrophones (underwater microphones) and other equipment. Wage’s group is focusing on analyzing data from the 5 km long vertical line array. Their research is relevant for a number of applications, including tracking seasonal variability of the ocean environment, detecting submarines, and conducting seismic surveys.

In 2016 Wage won the Harriett B. Rigas Award from the IEEE Education Society. The award, developed by the Education Society in cooperation with the Hewlett-Packard Company, recognizes outstanding faculty women who have made significant contributions to electrical/computer engineering education. 


 

Jana Košecká with robot

Jana Košecká

Researcher Opens the "Eyes" of Robots

Associate professor Jana Košecká is interested in computer vision and robotics, specifically "seeing" systems engaged in autonomous tasks, the acquisition of static and dynamic models of environments by means of visual sensing and human-computer interaction.

She came to Mason from a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California, Berkeley.

She has won the prestigious NSF CAREER Award and has published more than 70 peer-reviewed papers.

"I enjoy teaching students about computer vision, robotics, and artificial intelligence, and sharing lab space with lots of cool robots," she said.


 

Understanding Patterns Promotes Software Solutions

Amarda Shehu, with students

Amarda Shehu

Amarda Shehu, associate professor of computer science, works at the intersection of computer science and biology.

Shehu holds affiliated appointments in the Department of Systems Biology and the Department of Bioengineering. As a mathematician, she understands the beauty of patterns, and her work leads to new software solutions that solve biological problems.

She received her her Ph.D. in Computer Science from Rice University in Houston​, where she was an NIH fellow of the Nanobiology Training Program of the Gulf Coast Consortia.


 

Love of Bridges Leads to Creation of Sustainable Structures

David Lattanzi portrait

David Lattanzi

David Lattanzi, assistant professor, in the Sid and Reva Dewberry Department of Civil, Environmental & Infrastructure Engineering, was inspired and fascinated with the bridges that dot Pittsburgh, the city in which he grew up.

Out of this fascination grew a desire to build and create structures that could have a significant impact on the lives of people residing in cities and towns.

Lattanzi turned this inspiration into a Ph.D in civil and mechanical engineering and now teaches at the Volgenau School of Engineering.

He earned his PhD in Structural Engineering and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Washington.

He also holds an MS in Structural Engineering from Tufts University.


 

Driving Motor Control Theory Research

Wilsaan Joiner portrait

Wilsaan Joiner

Assistant professor Wilsaan Joiner’s Sensorimotor Integration Laboratory at Volgenau conducts translational research investigating human sensory integration, motor learning and control using computational and experimental approaches.

The work seeks to quantify the ability of healthy individuals to distinguish sensory changes, then apply this knowledge to diseases such as schizophrenia, in which people have difficulty distinguishing self-caused actions from externally caused events. 

He received his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2007. From 2007-2012, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and the National Eye Institute.


 

Holding a Big-Picture View

Jill Nelson, associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering loves the diversity of backgrounds her students have.

"Some are seeing electrical engineering for the first time; others have engineering work experience that allows them to connect theory to practice; and still others are entering engineering from another field as a second career."

Nelson is one of Mason's Teachers of Distinction, a cadre of faculty members who have created noteworthy teaching portfolios that showcase their commitment to teaching and learning. She attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, earning a Ph.D in Electrical Engineering.

Expertise