Meet Our Faculty

Faculty

  • Jens-Peter Kaps

    Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Cyber Security Engineering, College of Engineering and Computing

    Jens-Peter Kaps joined Mason after he received a PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 2006. He is a co-director of the Cryptographic Engineering Research Group (CERG) at the Volgenau School of Engineering. His research interests include ultra-low power cryptographic hardware design, side-channel analysis, computer arithmetic, efficient cryptographic algorithms, and ubiquitous computing.
  • This is a photo of Khaled Khasawneh

    Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering and Computing

    Khaled N. Khasawneh’s research interest is in computer architecture support for security, malware detection, adversarial machine learning, and side channels attacks. He previously interned at Facebook on the Community Integrity team. His 2018 paper in USENIX Workshop on offensive technologies received the best paper award.
  • Eugene Kim

    Assistant Professor Bioengineering College of Engineering and Computing

    Eugene Kim is primarily focused on engineering education and the scholarship of teaching and learning, specifically in the areas of active learning and team-based learning. His research interests have been in developing protein-based biomaterials using microbial platforms for the production of strong underwater bioadhesives and biocomposites. He received his BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan and PhD in Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis.
  • Associate Chair, Director of CEIE Graduate Program Sid and Reva Dewberry Department of Civil, Environmental, and Infrastructure Engineering College of Engineering and Computing

    Laura Kosoglu earned her PhD from Virginia Tech, where she studied factors that influence clay behavior for time-dependent processes such as secondary compression, shear deformation, and fault dynamics behavior as a National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) Doctoral Fellow, and Marion Via Doctoral Fellow. Her work resulted in the development of a novel experimental method to measure the coefficient of friction between clay particles at the micro-scale using an Atomic Force Microscope.
  • Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering and Computing

    Pelin Kurtay earned her PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from George Mason University. She is associate chair of the department and heads the undergraduate curriculum development efforts and other departmental initiatives. She is the recipient of the 2015 Teacher of Distinction Award at George Mason University for exceptional teaching and commitment to teaching-related activities in electrical and computer engineering and Information technology. She is a senior member of the IEEE.
  • Alexander Levis

    Professor Emeritus, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Volgenau

    Alexander H. Levis is University Professor of Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering. From 2001 to 2004 he served as the Chief Scientist of the U. S. Air Force at the Pentagon on leave from the university. He was educated at Ripon College where he received the AB degree (1963) in Mathematics and Physics and then at MIT where he received the BS (1963), MS (1965), ME (1967), and Sc.D. (1968) degrees in Mechanical Engineering with control systems as his area of specialization.
  • Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering and Computing

    Qiliang Li’s research is focused on semiconductor device technology, nanoelectronics and intelligent sensing systems. He became a faculty member in George Mason University in 2007. Prior to joining Mason, he was a scientist at the Semiconductor Electronics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), working on advanced CMOS devices and nanoelectronics. He is the Distinguished Virginia Microelectronics Consortium (VMEC) Chair Professor at George Mason University.
  • Term Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering and Computing

    For Craig Lorie, extensive work in the electrical engineering field naturally cultivated a love for software engineering. While it has been rare to find commercial positions that integrate the two disciplines in the past, advancing technologies will require greater attention to combining digital systems with design. This challenge is ultimately what brought him back to the classroom at George Mason University, as an adjunct faculty teaching digital systems. He joined the full-time faculty at the Volgenau School of Engineering in 2009.
  • A photo of associate professor Songjun Luo

    Associate Professor, Systems Engineering and Operations Research, College of Engineering and Computing

     

    Songjun Luo recently joined the SEOR department to support the MSDAE Program as an associate professor. Prior to joining Mason, Luo has been with ZS Associates for 26 years. Founded in 1983, ZS is one of the world’s largest consulting firms with currently 7,000+ professionals specialized in sales and marketing issues using data-driven analytical approaches. Having joined ZS in its infancy and having been a Partner for 20 years with the firm, Luo has played several key leadership roles in the firm, including project lead, client lead, practice lead, and office lead.
  • Associate Professor, Sid and Reva Dewberry Department of Civil, Environmental, and Infrastructure Engineering, College of Engineering and Computing

    Viviana Maggioni’s research interests lie at the intersection of hydrometeorology and remote sensing. Her research activities span from the local scale, by developing advanced environmental monitoring systems at the Mason campus, to the global scale, combining water resources engineering with hydrometeorology and remote sensing to evaluate conditions in remote regions, where ground truthing is impossible, but where environmental and health consequences can be devastating.